Share the Love of Christ with All!

THE THEME

           When the Hemgren Room was added, Pastor Paul Seastrand brought together the Ecclesiastical Arts Team to ensure that the Art was liturgical.   During that time the  stained glass windows were created as well as the etched windows between the sanctuary and the Hemgren Room.   These windows also bear a message about the seasons of the Church Year.   The etched windows were designed by Bob Jacobson in 1987.  The technique involves the creation of a design, then transferring it to an adhesive plastic that is placed on the glass. The artist then uses razor blades to cut the design and peels away the areas that need to be etched.  Some areas can be sandblasted more deeply than others for greater detail; this technique is called “stage blasting.”  Although these windows appear nearly identical, the designs are hand cut separately, making each a unique creation.

Moving from the west wall (Luther Wall) to the east, each of the windows features a historic cross depicting, respectively, the seasons of Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, Easter, and Pentecost. The seventh cross represents Saints’ Days, and the eighth and final window bears the cross of Martin Luther’s seal. Over the doorway is an etched “trefoil.” This symbol is integral to all the stained glass and etched windows, since it represents the eternal and sovereign God who is Three-in-One.

The ADVENT CROSS is represented by the Tau Cross. It is simply a Latin Cross with the upper arms missing, but the symbol is older in that it is said to have been the form of the staff which Moses raised up in the Wilderness (Numbers 21: 4-9). Other names for this symbol are Cross of the Old Testament, Prophetic Cross, and Anticipatory Cross. Hence, this cross tells of the imminent coming or “advent of Christ at Christmas.

 

The CHRISTMAS CROSS is the Ansate or Looped Cross. Used in Egypt before the time of Christ, it denoted life; and as Christianity assimilated the symbol, it was reinterpreted to mean the life, birth, and regeneration that God gives. It suggests that the prophesies of Christ became reality at His birth, and therefore Christmas means new life for us, too.

 

The EPIPHANY CROSS or Cross Crosslet, is so constructed as to suggest the four corners of the earth. It is a suitable symbol of Epiphany reminding us of Christ coming to all the world, and of the Church’s proclamation of the Gospel to all corners of the world.

 

The LENTEN CROSS is called the Passion Cross, so distinguished by the pointed ends on the arms. Also called the Cross of Suffering, it indicates the key days of Maundy Thursday  and Good Friday, which commemorate the sacrificial love of Christ.

 

 

 The EASTER CROSS, called the Cross of Glory, is a Latin Cross coupled with the rising sun behind so that the rays extend out from the intersection of the arms. This cross, which no longer holds the crucified Christ, with the rising sun behind, richly depicts the resurrection.

The PENTECOST CROSS is in French called the Triparted describes the three horizontal and three vertical arms, and Fleuree describes the endings of the arms resembling Cross Triparted Fleuree. fleur-de-lise (a trinity symbol). Together, these  symbols suggest the Pentecost season in which the whole God—Father, Son and Holy Spirit— is active in giving power and growth to the church.

 

The SAINTS’ CROSS, called the Cross Flamant, suggests that each arm is in flames.  Such fire is symbolic of religious spirit and zeal, and is thus appropriate in representing the faithful lives of the saints, who are all the baptized followers of Christ.

  The CROSS OF MARTIN LUTHER’S SEAL is this seal’s chief feature.  Said Luther: “The first thing expressed in my seal is a cross, black, within the heart, to put me in mind that faith in Christ crucified saves us.”  He desired that the cross be black for mortification, the rose white for the joy of faith, the field blue for the joy of heaven, and ring gold for eternal blessedness.

  The TREFOIL etching, with three circles blended into one whole figure, represents the unity of the Godhead—Father (Creator), Son (Savior) and Holy Spirit (Sanctifier).  This symbol expresses the whole reality of God who is Lord of all things, and who was, is, and will be forever.